Guide to the Jutta Schütt Collection

MSE/MD 3826

 

Collection Summary

Title: Jutta Schütt Collection
Dates: 1916-1939
Collection No.: MSE/MD 3826
Creator: Schütt, Jutta (b. 1910)
Creator: Russo, [NED] (b. 1897)
Creator: Grandinetti, Rose Elvira (b. 1901)
Extent: 53 folders; 3 containers; 1.5 linear feet
Language: Collection material in English and German
Repository: University of Notre Dame. Hesburgh Libraries, Department of Special Collections. 102 Hesburgh Library, Notre Dame, IN 46556
Abstract: A series of documents and letters from Jutta Schütt, Rose Elvira Grandinetti, Nicholas Emerson Dante Russo, and others, beginning in July 1916 and ending in July 1939.

Selected Search Terms

Mothers--Germany--1930-1940.
Mothers--Germany--Correspondence.
Third Reich, 1933-1945.
World War, 1914-1918.
American women in the 20th century.

Administrative Information

Restrictions: There are no access restrictions on this collection.

Preferred Citation: [Identification of item], Jutta Schütt Collection, [Collection and folder no.], Department of Special Collections, Hesburgh Libraries of Notre Dame.

Acquisition and Processing Note: The Jutta Schütt Collection was purchased by the Hesburgh Libraries in 2016, from Michael Brown. Arranged and described 2017, by Hannah Herbst. Finding aid 2017, by Hannah Herbst and Julie Tanaka.

Biographical Note

Jutta Schütt was born 27 October 1910 in Germany and lived in Berlin. She met Russo while he was studying in Heidelberg. Her correspondence began with Russo after he left Germany, a few months after the birth of her child. Her son, Ulrich Schütt, was born 34 March 1935. She also referred to Ulrich using a variety of names, including "Blinkins," "Justin," "Ulli," and "Bunny." Schütt was able to secure a secretarial position at "Elektroworks." She and her son temporarily lived in a home for unwed mothers. Due to financial difficulty, she was forced to change homes multiple times. Her relationship with Russo caused considerable tension between her and her family. Russo also had an affair with Lisa Schmücking before he left. This created a strained relationship for Schütt and Schmücking. Schütt assisted Russo in his writing ventures, including "St. W." ("Sterile World.") Jutta Schütt believed for a long time that Russo would return to Germany to take her and her son to the United States. As of 1939, he still had not done so.

Rose Elvira Grandinetti was born 3 June 1901 in New York, New York and lived in Hoboken, New Jersey. In 1916, while still in high school, she met Russo, who was twenty. Grandinetti married another man and likely had an illegitimate daughter (named Pat) with Russo during that period. She eventually married and lived with Russo.

Nicholas Emerson Dante [NED] Russo was born 4 March 1897 in New York, New York. He claimed to be an Italian American Roman Catholic. Russo used various forms of his name throughout his life, which resulted in the frequent scrambling of his name. Russo participated the First World War as a doctor. He spent some time in Germany, studying in Heidelberg, before returning to the United States. He had multiple affairs with women younger than him. He eventually married Vira Grandinetti, with whom he had had an illegitimate daughter, and started his own private practice. He also considered himself to be a writer.

Scope and Content Note

The Jutta Schütt Collection contains letters from a single, German mother recounting her experiences living under the Nazi regime. The collection also includes a series of early 20th century American courtship letters between NED Russo and Vira Grandinetti, beginning in 1916. The correspondence within the collection cover issues of American politics. The Schütt letters also deal with the evolving social and legal situation in Nazi Germany particularly in regard to custody and Aryan verification.

Arrangement Note

The collection is arranged chronologically by sender in four series: 1. NED Russo's correspondence with the Grandinetti family; 2. Miscellaneous Documents, including letters from other women in Germany to NED Russo; 3. the Jutta Schütt letters to NED Russo; 4. Ephemera.

Container List