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William Harris Crawford Papers

MSN/EA 0511

 

Collection Summary

Title: William Harris Crawford Papers
Dates: 1804-1868
Collection No.: MSN/EA 0511
Creator: Crawford, William H. (William Harris), 1772-1834
Extent: 2 containers; 1 linear foot.
Language: Collection material in English and French
Repository: University of Notre Dame. Hesburgh Libraries, Department of Special Collections. 102 Hesburgh Library, Notre Dame, IN 46556
Abstract: Political correspondence, family letters, and miscellaneous personal papers of William Harris Crawford, Republican of Georgia, who from 1807 to 1825 served as U. S. senator, U. S. minister to France, secretary of war, and secretary of the treasury. Crawford was also a candidate in the contentious presidential campaign of 1824. The collection includes around 175 manuscript letters, 1806-1868, and around 35 additional manuscripts.

Selected Search Terms

Crawford, William Harris, 1772-1834 -- Correspondence
United States -- Politics and government -- 1809-1817 -- Sources
United States -- Politics and government -- 1817-1825 -- Sources
United States -- Politics and government -- 1825-1829 -- Sources
Republican Party (U.S.: 1792-1828)
Georgia -- Political activity -- 19th century
United States -- Foreign relations -- 1812-1815
Ghent, Treaty of, 1814
United States. War Department -- History -- 19th century
Indians of North America -- Georgia
United States. Department of the Treasury
Finance, Public -- United States -- History -- 19th century
Presidents -- United States -- Election -- 1824
Calhoun, John C. (John Caldwell), 1782-1850
Monroe, James, 1758-1831
Jackson, Andrew, 1767-1845
Letters (correspondence)

Administrative Information

Restrictions: There are no access restrictions on this collection.

Preferred Citation: [Identification of item], William Harris Crawford Papers, [Collection and folder no.], Rare Books and Special Collections, Hesburgh Libraries of Notre Dame.

Acquisition and Processing Note: The William Harris Crawford Papers were purchased by the Libraries in July 2016 from Michael Brown Rare Books of Philadelphia (List 136, Item 8). When Chase C. Mooney was researching his 1974 biography of Crawford, these papers were in the hands of two of Crawford's great-great-grandaughters, Fanny Golding of Columbus, Mississippi and Mrs. E. E. Gross of Hattiesburg. Mooney stated that "they seem to be in the category of cherished items, they have not heretofore been available to researchers, and they bridge a number of gaps in other Crawfordiana" (William H. Crawford, Lexington KY, 1974, p. 348). In 2016 these same papers were sold by a great-great-great-great-grandson of Crawford to the Raab Collection, who sold the bulk of them to Michael Brown while retaining a few items for individual sale. Arranged and described 2017, by George Rugg. Finding aid 2017-18, by George Rugg.

Biographical Note

William Harris Crawford was born on 24 February 1772 in Amherst County (now Nelson County), Virginia, the sixth of eleven children of Joel Crawford and Fanny Harris Crawford. Joel's great-grandfather, John, Earl of Crawford, had emigrated to Virginia in 1643. During 1779-83 the family relocated several times, ultimately to Richmond County (now Columbia County), Georgia, near the present site of Appling. After several years of teaching and working on the family farm, Crawford entered Moses Waddell's Carmel Academy near Appling and remained for two years (1792-94), pursuing a curriculum that emphasized Latin, Greek, mathematics, and English grammar and literature. He first studied law during his tenure as a teacher of English at Richmond Academy in Augusta, and in 1799 moved to Lexington in Oglethorpe County to begin practice.

Around 1800 Georgia public life was dominated by the antagonism between two rival Democratic Republican party factions. That associated with John Clark of Wilkes County tended to attract small farmers and land speculators, many of North Carolina origin. That led by James Jackson of Savannah drew its strength from residents of older settled areas, many of them larger landholders moved from Virginia. As Crawford rose to public attention riding Georgia's Western Circuit, his opposition to gross land speculation earned him the enmity of Clark, culminating in several duels (including one fought with Clark himself). It also led to an assumption of leadership within the Jackson faction of the party, alongside George M. Troup.

In 1804 Crawford married Susanna Gerardin (1780-1863), daughter of a Savannah River Valley planter, with whom he would have three daughters and five sons. Around the same time he purchased a tract of land three miles from Lexington that over the years he would expand into a good-sized plantation, called "Woodlawn." At his death he held 1,300 acres and 45 slaves.

Crawford was first elected to public office in 1803, as a state representative from Oglethorpe County. In 1807 the Georgia legislature chose him to fill a vacancy in the U.S. Senate, a position to which he was reelected in 1811. From March 1812 to March 1813 Crawford served as president pro tempore of the Senate. His national stature is evident from the sequence of appointments that came his way over the next several years: U.S. minister to France during the War of 1812 (1813-15); secretary of war in the cabinet of James Madison (1815-16); and secretary of the treasury, a position he held for the remainder of Madison's second term and for the two terms of his successor, James Monroe. (In the March 1816 Republican congressional caucus held to select the party's presidential nominee, Crawford received 54 votes to Monroe's 65, though most today accept as genuine Crawford's disavowal of interest in contesting Monroe).

The Treasury was the largest, and perhaps most inefficient, of Washington's departments. It incorporated the customs service, the land offices, the post office, the internal revenue service, the coastal service, and many other agencies, to say nothing of its necessary relation to the newly established Second Bank of the United States (which Crawford supported). It is generally agreed that Crawford's greatest achievements as secretary were as an administrator, in overhauling and reorganizing the department bureaucracy, and in establishing a greater sense of accountability among its employees. Following the economic collapse of 1819 Crawford and his "Radical" supporters in the administration and Congress led the effort to curb the federal spending associated with the new or nationalist wing of the Republican Party. In an era of increased factionalism within the party, this made him many enemies, including Secretary of War John C. Calhoun and Gen. Andrew Jackson.

Campaigning among leading Republicans for the 1824 presidential election began almost as soon as Monroe was reelected in 1820. Crawford was a favorite, with a platform framed as a return to the virtues of Old Republicanism: strict construction of the Constitution, state sovereignty, fiscal rectitude. His chief opponents were Secretary of State John Quincy Adams, Henry Clay, Jackson, and Calhoun. In September 1823 the fifty-one year old Crawford suffered the onset of a serious illness, described by some as a stroke, whose effects were complicated by the improper ministration of medicines. The limitations imposed by this illness, together with a boycotting of the February 1824 Congressional nominating caucus (a system believed to favor Crawford) undermined his campaign, which ended with Adams's victory in a House vote. Crawford finished behind Jackson and Adams with 41 electoral votes, mostly from Virginia, Georgia, and New York (where he was supported by Martin Van Buren).

Crawford refused reappointment as treasury secretary under Adams and returned to Georgia. His health slowly improved, though he seems to have remained in some respects physically impaired. Though supporters urged him to reenter the national political scene he refrained from doing so, serving as judge of the Northern Circuit of the Superior Court of Georgia. An abiding legacy from his years in Washington was a bitterness towards Calhoun, whom he thought most responsible for keeping him from the presidency. Crawford died near Elberton, Georgia, on 15 September 1834.

Scope and Content Note

Series 1, General Correspondence, includes a total of 104 items, almost all of political or public interest. Most (89) are letters directed to William H. Crawford and retained by him. These span almost the whole of Crawford's political career, 1806 to 1833, without any obvious period emphasis. The letters were written by about 60 different correspondents. Among the more prominent public figures represented are: Robert Smith (as secretary of state); John Randolph of Roanoke; David R. Williams (as South Carolina governor); Thomas Worthington (as Ohio governor); John C. Calhoun (as secretary of war); James Barbour (as secretary of war); Thomas Hart Benton (as Missouri senator); Nathaniel Macon (as North Carolina senator); and Samuel Smith of Maryland. Among the Crawford allies and other Georgians of national repute with letters to Crawford are: George Matthews; Obadiah Jones; Charles Tait; John Forsythe; William W. Bibb; George M. Troup; John Stevens; and Thomas W. Cobb. Series 1 also includes 7 retained copies or letter drafts of Crawford's, many relating to a dispute with Calhoun in October 1821. There are also 8 letters written neither to nor by Crawford, many of them enclosures.

Series 2, Crawford Family Correspondence, includes 73 letters written either by or to (often between) members of the family, 1804 to 1868. There is one letter by William Harris Crawford (to his wife Susanna, 7 May 1833), and there are 8 directed to him. Most of the remaining letters were written by or to Crawford's children: Caroline (b. 1805); Eliza Ann (b. 1809); William Jr. (b. 1813); Susan (b. 1819); and Bibb (b. 1821).

Series 3, Miscellaneous Manuscripts and Printed Ephemera, includes 35 items, mostly manuscript, totalling 169 manuscript pages. Among the more substantial items are: a file of ten documents relating to the 1806 impeachment hearings in the Georgia legislature against Crawford ally Charles Tait (35 pages); a file compiled by the U.S. minister to Portugal in 1815 on events in Brazil (60 pages); manuscripts relating to Crawford's currency report of 1820 (15 pages); and an essay (ca. 1825) on Crawford's Indian policies as secretary of war (34 pages).

Arrangement Note

The Crawford Papers comprise three series: 1) General Correspondence; 2) Crawford Family Correspondence; 3) Miscellaneous Manuscripts and Printed Ephemera. The first and third are arranged chronologically; the second is arranged by family member.

Related Material

According to Chase Mooney, a substantial collection of Crawford's personal papers was destroyed by fire in the 1860s, with the burning of the home of a son-in-law, Charles M. Dudley. Dudley had assembled Crawford's papers with the aim of writing a memoir. Surviving papers are scattered among numerous repositories. Larger collections include the William Harris Crawford Papers at the Library of Congress (around 300 items) and the William Harris Crawford Papers at the William R. Perkins Library, Duke University (around 126 items).

Container List

  • Series 1: William H. Crawford: General Correspondence 
    • Folder 1 (MSN/EA 0511-1) Letter: Bolling Hall, Sparta, Georgia, to William H. Crawford, Oglethorpe County, Georgia, 1806 September 10. ALS, 1 page on one folded sheet, w/integral address leaf.
      Bolling Hall (1767-1836) was, at the time of writing, a U.S. congressman from Georgia and a political ally of William Crawford. Here he discusses George M. Troup (1780-1856), then serving as a state legislator in Georgia, and Troup's prospects of attaining a Congressional seat.
      • Folder 2 (MSN/EA 0511-2) Letter: Jared Irwin, Milledgeville, Georgia, to John Milledge and William H. Crawford, Georgia, 1808 January 19. LS, 2 pages on one folded sheet, w/integral address leaf.
        At the time of writing Jared Irwin (1750-1818) was governor of Georgia. The letter authorizes Milledge and Crawford to contract for arms and ammunition for the Georgia militia.
        • Folder 3 (MSN/EA 0511-3) Letter: Robert Smith, Washington, D.C., to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1810 June 20. LS, 1 page on one folded sheet.
          At the time of writing Robert Smith (1757-1842) was U.S. Secretary of State. The letter authorizes Crawford to select and pay an individual qualified to execute the "policy of the President in relationship to the Floridas." There were more details in an enclosed letter, not present.
          • Folder 4 (MSN/EA 0511-4) Letter: John Randolph of Roanoke, Roanoke, Virginia, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1811 April 28. ALS, 2 pages on one folded sheet, w/integral address leaf.
            John Randolph of Roanoke, Virginia (1773-1833) served in the U.S. Congress from 1799-1813. He writes in response to Crawford's letter of 28 March 1811. The letter begins with a discussion of recent newspaper attacks against Crawford, which Randolph finds repugnant. It then moves on to discussions of local elections and political machinations. It closes with other gossip about likely mutual acquaintances.
            • Folder 5 (MSN/EA 0511-5) Letter: George Matthews, Oglethorpe County, Georgia, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1811 October 11. ALS, 2 pages on one folded sheet, w/integral address leaf.
              George Matthews (1739-1812) was a former Georgia governor who, at the time of writing, was embroiled in the U.S. government's scheme to provoke an uprising against the Spanish in East Florida. In the letter, Matthews seeks to arrange a meeting with Crawford.
              • Folder 6 (MSN/EA 0511-6) Letter: Edward F. Tattnall, Litchfield, Connecticut, to William H. Crawford, Augusta, Georgia, 1812 August 4. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet, w/integral address leaf.
                Tattnall (1788-1832), a future member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Georgia, writes seeking Crawford's influence in obtaining a captaincy in the U.S. Army.
                • Folder 7 (MSN/EA 0511-7) Letter: Obadiah Jones, Madison, Mississippi Territory, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1813 April 7. ALS, 4 pages on one folded sheet, w/integral address leaf.
                  At the time of writing Jones (c1763-1825) owned a plantation, Spring Hill, near what is now Athens, Alabama. He was a pioneer of Oglethorpe County, Georgia and a close friend of Crawford. In this densely written letter he offers Crawford financial assistance; discusses the possible division of Mississippi Territory and the War of 1812; and speaks of personal and family matters.
                  • Folder 8 (MSN/EA 0511-8) Letter: Joel Abbott, Washington, D.C., to William H. Crawford, Washington D.C., 1813 April 24. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet, w/integral address leaf.
                    Abbott (1766-1826) writes Crawford to promote his theory of magnetism, whereby ". . . Longitude will be practically explained to the most unskillful mariner . . . ."
                    • Folder 9 (MSN/EA 0511-9) Letter: William M. Gibson, Charleston, South Carolina, to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1814 March 22. ALS, 6 pages on 2 folded sheets, w/integral address leaf.
                      Gibson brings Crawford (then in Paris) up to date on regional and national public events, especially politics and the war.
                      • Folder 10 (MSN/EA 0511-10) Letter: Christopher Hughes, Jr., Ghent, to William H. Crawford, Paris, France, 1814 July 26. ALS, 2 pages on one folded sheet, w/integral address leaf.
                        At the time of writing Hughes (1786-1849) was secretary for the American delegation negotiating the Treaty of Ghent. Hughes writes to introduce two friends who will shortly be in Paris.
                        • Folder 11 (MSN/EA 0511-11) Letter: Christopher Hughes, Jr., Ghent, to William H. Crawford, Paris, France, 1814 August 12. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet, w/integral address leaf.
                          Directives from the commissioners at Ghent.
                          • Folder 12 (MSN/EA 0511-12) Letter: Thomas Sumter, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to William H. Crawford, Paris, France, 1815 March 7. LS, 2 pages on one folded sheet.
                            At the time of writing Sumter (1768-1840) was U.S. minister to Portugal. He writes to introduce General Manuel Belgrano and Don Bernadino de Rivadavia, leaders in the fight for Argentine independence.
                            • Folder 13 (MSN/EA 0511-13) Letter: John Hawkes, Plymouth, England, to William H. Crawford, London, England, 1815 May 14. ALS, 2 pages on one folded sheet, w/integral address leaf.
                              Notes the arrival of Neptune to return Crawford to America.
                              • Folder 14 (MSN/EA 0511-14) Letter: G. B. Milligan, Wilmington, Delaware, to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1815 August 4. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet.
                                An update on the health of former Ghent commissioner James A. Bayard of Delaware (1767-1815), who had travelled with Crawford on Neptune. Bayard died on 6 August.
                                • Folder 15 (MSN/EA 0511-15) Letter: Henry Jackson, Paris, France, to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1815 September 26. ALS, 4 pages on one folded sheet.
                                  At the time of writing Dr. Henry Jackson was serving as U.S. chargé d'affaires at Paris, following Crawford's departure. This is a cover letter for diplomatic papers, and an unofficial request to be replaced.
                                  • Folder 16 (MSN/EA 0511-16) Letter: Nathaniel G. Ingraham, Jr., London, England, to William H. Crawford, Washington, D.C., 1815 October 11. ALS, 4 pages on one folded sheet.
                                    Ingraham seeks Crawford's support, as Secretary of War, in affirming his appointment as consul general of the U.S. for the Western District of England.
                                    • Folder 17 (MSN/EA 0511-17) Letter: David R. Williams, Centre Hall, South Carolina, to William H. Crawford, Washington, D.C., 1815 November 9. ALS, 2 pages on one folded sheet, w/integral address leaf.
                                      At the time of writing David R. Williams (1776-1830) was governor of South Carolina. The letter's political content mostly concerns the South Carolina militia.
                                      • Folder 18 (MSN/EA 0511-18) Letter: Robert Finley, Basking Ridge, New Jersey, to William H. Crawford, Washington, D.C., 1816 February 10. ALS, 2 pages on one folded sheet, w/integral address leaf.
                                        Finley (1772-1817) writes regarding his appointment as president of the University of Georgia, and the proposed salary.
                                        • Folder 19 (MSN/EA 0511-19) Letter: V. Vail, Baltimore, Maryland, to William H. Crawford, Washington, D.C., 1816 April 6. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet, w/integral address leaf.
                                          In French. Vail replies to Crawford with particulars of his school in Baltimore.
                                          • Folder 20 (MSN/EA 0511-20) Letter: William H. Crawford, Washington, D.C., to "Gentlemen," n.p., 1816 September 7. ALS, 4 pages on one folded sheet.
                                            Retained draft of instructions on negotiations with Native Americans in Indian Territory.
                                            • Folder 21 (MSN/EA 0511-21) Letter: George M. Bibb, Frankfort, Kentucky, to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1816 October 14. ALS, 4 pages on one folded sheet.
                                              George M. Bibb (1776-1859) was a former U.S. senator from Kentucky who at the time of writing was working as a lawyer in Frankfort. He writes to lobby for Robert Trimble's appointment as federal judge for the Kentucky District.
                                              • Folder 22 (MSN/EA 0511-22) Letter: Peter Early, Milledgeville, Georgia, to William H. Crawford, Washington, D.C., 1816 November 20. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet, w/integral address leaf.
                                                At the time of writing Peter Early (1773-1817) was serving in the Georgia state senate. He informs Crawford of local support for various applicants for the position of federal agent to the Creek Nation, among other political matters.
                                                • Folder 23 (MSN/EA 0511-23) Letters: Jared Mansfield, West Point, New York, to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1817 January 2-22. 3 ALsS, 14 pages on four folded sheets.
                                                  At the time of writing Jared Mansfield (1759-1830) was professor of mathematics and experimental philosophy at West Point. From 1803 to 1812 he served as Surveyor General of the United States. These three letters constitute an extended report to Crawford on circumstances at the U.S. Military Academy. They are especially critical of academy superintendent Capt. Alden Partridge.
                                                  • Folder 24 (MSN/EA 0511-24) Letter: Thomas Worthington, Columbus and Chillicothe, Ohio, to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1817 January 15 and February 20. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet.
                                                    At the time of writing Thomas Worthington (1773-1827) was the Republican governor of Ohio. He writes of his support for Crawford and of circumstances surrounding the Republican congessional nominating caucus of the previous year.
                                                    • Folder 25 (MSN/EA 0511-25) Letter: William Tatham, n.p., to William H. Crawford, Washington D.C., 1817 February 16. ALS, 4 pages on one folded sheet.
                                                      A long-winded request by Tatham (1752-1819) for employment in the Treasury Department (granted when he was appointed military storekeeper at the U.S. Arsenal near Richmond).
                                                      • Folder 26 (MSN/EA 0511-26) Letter: Thomas Appleton, Leghorn, Italy, to William H. Crawford, Washington D.C., 1817 March-August. 2 ALsS and 1 AL, 24 pages on six folded sheets. Two of the letters are incomplete.
                                                        Thomas Appleton (1763-1840) was U.S. consul at Leghorn (Livorno) in Tuscany from 1798 until his death in 1840. In these letters he seeks Crawford's aid in obtaining financial considerations from the government, and emphasizes the benefits for the U.S. of trading for goods through his port. The letters are dated March 5, May 1, and August 1.
                                                        • Folder 27 (MSN/EA 0511-27) Letter: Thomas U. P. Charlton, Savannah, Georgia, to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1817 April 28. ALS, 14 pages on four folded sheets.
                                                          Local and national political scuttlebutt, from the Republican mayor of Savannah, Georgia, Thomas Charlton (1779-1835).
                                                          • Folder 28 (MSN/EA 0511-28) Letter: William Cumming, Augusta, Georgia, to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1817 May 29. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet.
                                                            Col. Cumming (1788-1863), an Augusta planter and veterean of the war of 1812, respectfully declines an unspecified appointment.
                                                            • Folder 29 (MSN/EA 0511-29) Letter: Charles Tait, n.p., to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1817 July 28. ALS, 8 pages on two folded sheets.
                                                              Charles Tait (1768-1835) was a longtime political ally of Crawford's, and at the time of writing U.S. senator from Georgia. In response to a letter from Crawford, Tait comments on the reduction of the national debt, the Florida question, the position of Secretary of War, land in Alabama, and other matters.
                                                              • Folder 30 (MSN/EA 0511-30) Letter: Thomas Worthington, Chillicothe, Ohio, to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1817 August 6. ALS, 10 pages on three folded sheets.
                                                                • Folder 31 (MSN/EA 0511-31) Letter: Henry Jackson, Paris, France, to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1817 July 28. ALS, 8 pages on two folded sheets.
                                                                  The chargé d'affaires at Paris submits his accounts for payment.
                                                                  • Folder 32 (MSN/EA 0511-32-F1) Letter: Elias Cornelius, Natchez, Mississippi, to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1817 December 16. ALS, 7 pages on one folded sheet and two sheets.
                                                                    Elias Cornelius (1794-1832) was a graduate of Yale Divinity School and an agent for the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions. Having spent ample time among the "four Southern Tribes" (Cherokee, Creek, Choctaw, Chickasaw) in Tennessee and elsewhere, Cornelius argues that their removal from their present lands would be detrimental to their continued "civilization" (i.e., their conversion to Christianity and general acculturation to white ways). He also seeks to disprove "reports very unfavorable to my character" sent by Tennessee governor Joseph McMinn to the Secretary of War, by including in an appendix copies of letters between himself and Rev. David A. Sherman of Knoxville.
                                                                    • Folder 33 (MSN/EA 0511-33) Letter: George Blake, Boston, Massachusetts, to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1817 December 17. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet.
                                                                      George Blake (1769-1841) was at the time of writing U.S. district attorney of Massachusetts. The letter concerns the Buenos Ayrean privateer Congresso.
                                                                      • Folder 34 (MSN/EA 0511-34) Letter: Thomas Worthington, Chillicothe, Ohio, to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1819 March 29. ALS, 7 pages on two folded sheets, w/integral address leaf.
                                                                        • Folder 35 (MSN/EA 0511-35) Letter: John Forsyth, Madrid, Spain, to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1819 June 25. ALS, 4 pages on one folded sheet.
                                                                          John Forsythe (1780-1841) was a U.S. representative and senator from Georgia who later served as Secretary of State under Jackson and Van Buren. At the time of writing he was U.S. minister to Spain. Forsyth describes the difficulties of his position pending Spanish ratification of the Adams-Onís Treaty of 1819.
                                                                          • Folder 36 (MSN/EA 0511-36) Letter: William W. Bibb, Huntsville, Alabama, to William H. Crawford, Washington D.C., 1819 November 9. ALS, 7 pages on two folded sheets, w/integral address leaf.
                                                                            William Wyatt Bibb (1781-1820) was a medical doctor who served as a U.S. representative and senator from Georgia, filling the vacancy created by Crawford's resignation in 1813. At the time of writing he was governor of Alabama, the first in the state's history. Bibb writes Crawford about land speculation, his electon as governor, Andrew Jackson, and other political matters.
                                                                            • Folder 37 (MSN/EA 0511-37) Letter: Thomas U. P. Charlton, Savannah, Georgia, to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1821 April 11. ALS, 8 pages on two folded sheets.
                                                                              • Folder 38 (MSN/EA 0511-38) Letter: W. Lee, n.p., to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1821 May 29. ALS, 5 pages on two folded sheets, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                Lee writes of difficulties with a dismissed clerk.
                                                                                • Folder 39 (MSN/EA 0511-39) Letter: William H. Crawford, Washington D.C., to Thomas W. Cobb and Stephen Upson, Lexington, Georgia, 1821 October 15. AL, 3 pages on one folded sheet, with separated address leaf. Incomplete. With four enclosed copies of letters.
                                                                                  This cover letter and its four enclosures, directed to Crawford allies Cobb and Upson, relate to a disagreement between Crawford and Secretary of War John C. Calhoun over the appointment of Gen. Thomas Flournoy as commissioner to the Creek Indians in 1820. Both Crawford and Calhoun denied ultimate responsibility for the appointment. To make his point, possibly for publication, Crawford assembled: 1) a copy of a letter of December 1820 from Gen. David Adams to Georgia governor John Clark, stating that Calhoun proposed the appointment of Flournoy; 2) a copy of a letter from Clark to Calhoun dated 27 August 1821, in Crawford's hand, requesting a copy of the recommendation whereby Flournoy was appointed; 3) a reply from Calhoun to Clark, dated 12 October 1821, copied by Crawford, in which Calhoun recalls that Crawford proposed Flournoy; 4) a retained copy of Crawford's reply to Calhoun, 13 October 1821.
                                                                                  • Folder 40 (MSN/EA 0511-40) Note: John C. Calhoun, Washington D.C., to William H, Crawford, Washington D.C., 1821 October 17. ANS, 1 page on one sheet.
                                                                                    A brief reply to Crawford's of the 13th, in which Calhoun says that "my recollection of the facts [of the Flournoy affair] remains unchanged."
                                                                                    • Folder 41 (MSN/EA 0511-41) Letter: William H. Crawford, Washington D.C., to Thomas W. Cobb, Lexington, Georgia 1821 October 17. AL, 7 pages on two folded sheets, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                      Following up with Cobb on the Flournoy affair, Crawford seeks to summarize his relations with Calhoun, distinguishing their personal feelings from the attitudes of their respective followers. He describes in considerable detail a conversation with Calhoun of 12 October, touching on prospects for the elections of 1824. He concludes: "It is certainly not my interest, that he should be unfriendly to me. It is not my interest that he should be irritated by my friends, even if he is unfriendly, as long as he does not openly declare himself against me."
                                                                                      • Folder 42 (MSN/EA 0511-42) Letter: William H. Crawford, Washington D.C., to Thomas W. Cobb and Stephen Upson, n.p., 1821 October 20. ALS, 4 pages on one folded sheet.
                                                                                        In this retained copy, Crawford informs his supporters "that I have in my possession proof much stronger than any he [Governor John Clark of Georgia] has employed against me of the truth of my charge against him of interfering to procure the recommendations from the Grand Jury in favor of Mr. Griffin in 1803." Clark was an old enemy of Crawford's; the two fought a duel in 1806.
                                                                                        • Folder 43 (MSN/EA 0511-43) Correspondence: John A. Cuthbert, Athens, Georgia, to William H. Crawford, Athens, Georgia, 1822 August 6-8. 3 ALsS, 9 pages on three folded sheets.
                                                                                          In 1822 Cuthbert, a former U.S representative from Georgia, was elected to the Georgia house and appointed U.S. commissioner to the Creek and Cherokee. The group includes two letters from Cuthbert to Crawford, dated 6 and 7 August, and a retained draft of Crawford's reply (8 August). Cuthbert claims that stories harmful to his reputation are circulating, harking back to an 1820 incident in which he supposedly asked Crawford for a loan and was rebuffed. Crawford provides his recollection of the episode.
                                                                                          • Folder 44 (MSN/EA 0511-44) Letter: David Barton, Washington D.C., to William H. Crawford, Washington D.C., 1823 December 26. ALS, 1 page on one folded sheet, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                            • Folder 45 (MSN/EA 0511-45) Letter: Nathaniel Potter, Baltimore, Maryland, to Asbury Dickins, Washington D.C., 1825 February 28. ALS, 1 page on one folded sheet, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                              Re Crawford's departure from office.
                                                                                              • Folder 46 (MSN/EA 0511-46) Letter: P. Allison, Alexandria, Virginia, to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1825 August 5. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                Seeking recommendation for a Treasury Department clerkship.
                                                                                                • Folder 47 (MSN/EA 0511-47) Letter: James Barbour, Washington D.C., to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1825 September 25. ALS, 11 pages on three folded sheets.
                                                                                                  At the time of writing James Barbour of Virginia (1775-1842) was U.S. Secretary of War. In this long letter he counters Crawford's stated criticisms of the "Creek Treaty" (the Treaty of Indian Springs), ratified by the Senate in March 1825.
                                                                                                  • Folder 48 (MSN/EA 0511-48) Letter: George M. Troup, Milledgeville, Georgia, to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1825 November 1. ALS, 1 page on one sheet.
                                                                                                    At the time this letter was written George Troup was governor of Georgia. He writes in support of Crawford's position on the Indian Springs treaty.
                                                                                                    • Folder 49 (MSN/EA 0511-49) Letter: Thomas Hart Benton, Washington D.C., to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1825 December 12. ALS, 2 pages on one folded sheet, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                      At the time of writing Thomas Hart Benton (1782-1858) was a first-term U.S. senator from Missouri. In forwarding a pamphlet, Benton discusses the composition of the Senate, and the number of members friendly to Crawford.
                                                                                                      • Folder 50 (MSN/EA 0511-50) Letter: Walter Lowrie, Washington D.C., to William H. Crawford, Darien, Georgia, 1826 January 28. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                        Walter Lowrie (1784-1868) was a former U.S. senator from Pennsylvania who at the time of writing was serving as secretary of the Senate. He sends Crawford news of the 19th Congress.
                                                                                                        • Folder 51 (MSN/EA 0511-51) Letter: Nathaniel Macon, Washington D.C., to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1826 March 26. ALS, 2 pages on one folded sheet, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                          At the time of writing Nathaniel Macon (1757-1837) was U.S. senator from North Carolina. He sends Crawford news of the doings of the 19th Congress.
                                                                                                          • Folder 52 (MSN/EA 0511-52) Letter: William King, Bath, Maine, to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1826 April 16. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet. Accompanied by a letter from King to Lewis Williams, with instructions for delivery (16 April), and a cover letter from Williams to Crawford (23 April).
                                                                                                            William King (1768-1852) was a merchant and shipbuilder who served as Maine's first governor. King provides political intelligence on support for Crawford in the New England states, and on President Adams.
                                                                                                            • Folder 53 (MSN/EA 0511-53) Letter: John Rodman, St Augustine, Florida, to William H. Crawford, Washington D.C., 1826 June 15. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                              Medical advice from Rodman (1775-1847), collector of the port of St. Augustine.
                                                                                                              • Folder 54 (MSN/EA 0511-54) Letter: Jonathan Hagerty, Catahoula, Louisiana, to William H. Crawford, Washington D.C., 1825 December 12. 2 pages on one folded sheet, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                Hagerty, an "old friend and acquaintance," asks Crawford for intelligence on the price of blacks in the Washington area, for potential resale in the Deep South. Written in the hand of Baldwin Mollette.
                                                                                                                • Folder 55 (MSN/EA 0511-55) Letter: Samuel Smith, Baltimore, Maryland, to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1826 October 13. ALS, 4 pages on one folded sheet.
                                                                                                                  Samuel Smith (1752-1839), a longtime U.S. representative and senator from Maryland, writes of congressional intrigue, Jackson, and the upcoming 1828 Presidential election.
                                                                                                                  • Folder 56 (MSN/EA 0511-56) Letter: Charles Tait, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1826 November 5. ALS, 4 pages on one folded sheet, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                    Tait describes his travels in the North and tells Crawford of his continued popularity there.
                                                                                                                    • Folder 57 (MSN/EA 0511-57) Letter: Bolling Hall, Ellerslie, Autauga County, Alabama, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1826 December 20. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                      Thoughts on politics: Adams, Jackson, the 1828 election, and Georgia Republicans.
                                                                                                                      • Folder 58 (MSN/EA 0511-58) Letter: Nathaniel Macon, Washington D.C., to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1827 January 26. ALS, 2 pages on one folded sheet.
                                                                                                                        Speculation on Adams's and Jackson's chances for the Presidency.
                                                                                                                        • Folder 59 (MSN/EA 0511-59) Letter: Samuel ?, Sidney, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1827 February 1. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                          Cover letter, transmitting a copy of a speech on Jefferson.
                                                                                                                          • Folder 60 (MSN/EA 0511-60) Letter: Levett Harris, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1827 March 12. ALS, 7 pages on two folded sheets, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                            Levett Harris was a former U.S. chargé d'affaires at St. Petersburg, Russia. The letter is a long account of a trial resolving a libel suit brought by Harris against William D. Lewis, in which Crawford provided testimony supportive of the plaintiff.
                                                                                                                            • Folder 61 (MSN/EA 0511-61) Letter: John Forsyth, Augusta, Georgia, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1827 March 6. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                              Political news, including Forsyth's own involvement in the Georgia gubernatorial canvass and his likely replacement in Congress.
                                                                                                                              • Folder 62 (MSN/EA 0511-62) Letter: John Stevens, Savannah, Georgia, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1827 June 13. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                                Stevens has read with surprise of Crawford's appointment as judge for Georgia's Northern Circuit, and wonders if he will accept, or if he will seek higher office.
                                                                                                                                • Folder 63 (MSN/EA 0511-63) Letter: Jacob Scudder, Hightower, Georgia, to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1827 June 22. ALS, 1 page on one sheet.
                                                                                                                                  Re: back pay of soldier Thomas Everett.
                                                                                                                                  • Folder 64 (MSN/EA 0511-64) Letter: W.C. Preston, et al, to William H. Crawford, Athens, Georgia, 1827 July 6. Printed circular, 1 page on one folded sheet, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                                    A printed letter sent by a committee of six South Carolinians expressing opposition to the Federal woolens bill of 1827, placing higher duties on the importation of these goods.
                                                                                                                                    • Folder 65 (MSN/EA 0511-65) Letter: Augustus Baldwin Longstreet, Greensboro, Georgia, to Thomas W. Cobb, Milledgeville, Georgia, 1827 November 7. ALS, 1 page on one sheet, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                                      Forwarding an argument for a legal case.
                                                                                                                                      • Folder 66 (MSN/EA 0511-66) Letter: Alfred Balch, Sans Souci, Nashville, Tennessee, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1828 January 17. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                                        Balch (1785-1853) was a Nashville lawyer and a close friend and political supporter of Andrew Jackson. He writes of the upcoming presidential election, the need to rally behind Jackson, and plans for thwarting Calhoun (who "has all the ambition of Aaron Burr and as little principle").
                                                                                                                                        • Folder 67 (MSN/EA 0511-67) Letter: Bartlett Yancey, Jr., Oakland, near Milton, North Carolina, to William H. Crawford, Woodlawn, Lexington, Georgia, 1828 February 5. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                                          Yancey (1785-1828) was speaker of the North Carolina Senate. He writes to learn the particulars of the Georgia legislature's nomination of Crawford for Vice President, and describes the support for Jackson and others within the North Carolina legislature.
                                                                                                                                          • Folder 68 (MSN/EA 0511-68) Letter: George A. Hughes, Baltimore, Maryland, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1828 March 1. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                                            Sending seeds and produce; some political chat.
                                                                                                                                            • Folder 69 (MSN/EA 0511-69) Letter: John Stevens, Savannah, Georgia, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1828 March 11. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                                              Sending seeds; family news.
                                                                                                                                              • Folder 70 (MSN/EA 0511-70) Letter: William King, Bath, Maine, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1828 March 13. ALS, 2 pages on one folded sheet, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                                                Campaign intrigue from New England: will Adams' supporters withdraw him as unelectable and turn to Crawford?
                                                                                                                                                • Folder 71 (MSN/EA 0511-71) Letter: Bolling Hall, n.p., to William H. Crawford, Sparta, Georgia, 1828 March 28. ALS, 2 pages on one folded sheet, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                                                  Intrigue re Henry Clay and the "corrupt bargain" of 1824.
                                                                                                                                                  • Folder 72 (MSN/EA 0511-72) Letter: Thomas W. Cobb, Washington D.C., to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1828 April 17. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet. 1 enclosure.
                                                                                                                                                    Conveying to Crawford a note (15 April 1828) from Eugene A. Vail to Cobb, apprising him of the completion of some business for Crawford. Also, news from Washington.
                                                                                                                                                    • Folder 73 (MSN/EA 0511-73) Letter: James Camak, Milledgeville, Georgia, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1828 May 24. ALS, 2 pages on one folded sheet, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                                                      In the wake of the passage of the Tariff of Abominations of 1828, Camak seeks feedback on an idea to provoke popular resistance: ". . . our merchants would be compelled to annex to every article charged in the bills of their customers, the precise amount of tax to which the article is subject under the tariff."
                                                                                                                                                      • Folder 74 (MSN/EA 0511-74) Letter: James Brown, Paris, to William H. Crawford, n.p., 1828 December 28. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet.
                                                                                                                                                        At the time of writing James Brown (1766-1835) was American minister to France. He sends Crawford a copy of the Marquis de Marbois' work on the Louisiana Purchase Treaty, and expresses his satisfaction with Jackson's majority in the recent presidential election.
                                                                                                                                                        • Folder 75 (MSN/EA 0511-75) Letter: George R. Gilmer, Washington D.C., to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1829 January 8. Printed circular, 3 pages on one folded sheet. w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                                                          In October 1828 George R. Gilmer was elected to the U. S. House of Representatives, only to have his seat vacated because he failed to signify his acceptance of office within the time specified by law. In this circular, Gilmer argues that the vacating of his seat was unconstitutional.
                                                                                                                                                          • Folder 76 (MSN/EA 0511-76) Letter: Henry G. Lamar, Macon, Georgia, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1829 July 23. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet, w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                                                            In 1829 Henry G. Lamar (1798-1861) was elected to the seat in the U. S. House vacated by George R. Gilmer. In this letter to Crawford he describes his motives for seeking the position.
                                                                                                                                                            • Folder 77 (MSN/EA 0511-77) Letter: David R. Williams, Society Hill, South Carolina, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1830 October 31. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet. w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                                                              David Rogerson Williams was a planter and manufacturer who at the time of writing was a member of the South Carolina state senate. Content is political, and pertains to Crawford's efforts to assemble a convention to amend the Constitution.
                                                                                                                                                              • Folder 78 (MSN/EA 0511-78) Letter: John Forsyth, Georgetown, D. C., to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1831 January 26. ALS, 2 pages on one folded sheet. w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                                                                At the time of writing John Forsyth (1780-1841) was U.S. senator from Georgia. He writes of President Jackson's favorable response on reading a copy of a letter written by Crawford to Calhoun in October 1830.
                                                                                                                                                                • Folder 79 (MSN/EA 0511-79) Letter: William H. Crawford, Woodlawn, Lexington, Georgia, Asbury Dickens, n.p., 1831 March 1. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet.
                                                                                                                                                                  At the time of writing Asbury Dickens was chief clerk of the Treasury department. In this retained copy, Crawford seeks favors of Dickens that will further his intrigues agaisnt Calhoun.
                                                                                                                                                                  • Folder 80 (MSN/EA 0511-80) Letter: Alfred Balch, Nashville, Tennessee, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1831 March 6. ALS, 2 pages on one folded sheet. w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                                                                    More on Calhoun.
                                                                                                                                                                    • Folder 81 (MSN/EA 0511-81) Letter: Richard Henry Wilde, Washington DC, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1831 March 18. ALS, 4 pages on one folded sheet.
                                                                                                                                                                      Wilde was a U.S. representative from Georgia. He writes to inform Crawford of the Supreme Court's decision to decline to take jurisdiction in the case Cherokee Nation v. Georgia.
                                                                                                                                                                      • Folder 82 (MSN/EA 0511-82) Letter: John Williams, Knoxville, Tennessee, to William H. Crawford, Woodlawn, Lexington, Georgia, 1831 March 24. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet. w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                                                                        Williams, former U. S. senator from Tennessee, recalls events of 1818-19 (especially the invasion of Florida) as they pertain to relations between Jackson, Crawford, and Calhoun.
                                                                                                                                                                        • Folder 83 (MSN/EA 0511-83) Letter: Alfred Balch, Sans Souci near Nashville, Tennessee, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1831 May. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet. w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                                                                          More on the origins of Jackson's enmity for Crawford, dating back to 1818.
                                                                                                                                                                          • Folder 84 (MSN/EA 0511-84) Letter: Whitfield Brooks, Edgefield Court House, South Carolina, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1831 May 16. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet. w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                                                                            On money due Crawford from the sale of family property.
                                                                                                                                                                            • Folder 85 (MSN/EA 0511-85) Letter: Bolling Hall, Ellerslie, Autauga County, Alabama, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1831 June 17. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet. w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                                                                              On the dangers of Freemasonry.
                                                                                                                                                                              • Folder 86 (MSN/EA 0511-86) Letter: William W. Holt, Augusta, Georgia, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1831 September 9. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet. w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                                                                                Responding to a request for a legal opinion.
                                                                                                                                                                                • Folder 87 (MSN/EA 0511-87) Letter: John Floyd, Bellevue, Camden County, Georgia, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1831 September 15. ALS, 2 pages on one folded sheet. w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                                                                                  John Floyd was a plantation owner in Camden County. He writes to decline his appointment as delegate to an anti-tariff convention in Philadelphia.
                                                                                                                                                                                  • Folder 88 (MSN/EA 0511-88) Letter: Bolling Hall, Ellerslie, Autauga County, Alabama, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1831 October 26. ALS, 3 pages on one folded sheet. w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                                                                                    On Jackson and the Anti-Masonic Party.
                                                                                                                                                                                    • Folder 89 (MSN/EA 0511-89) Letter fragment: Bolling Hall, n.p., to [William H. Crawford], n.p., n.d. ALS, 2 pages on one sheet. Lacking pp. 1-4.
                                                                                                                                                                                      Conclusion of a letter whose remaining pages deal primarily with Masonry.
                                                                                                                                                                                      • Folder 90 (MSN/EA 0511-90) Letter: Bolling Hall, Ellerslie, Autauga County, Alabama, to William H. Crawford, Lexington, Georgia, 1833 January 9. ALS, 2 pages on one folded sheet. w/ integral address leaf.
                                                                                                                                                                                        Hall voices his support for nullification.
                                                                                                                                                                                        • Folder 91 (MSN/EA 0511-91) Letter: George M. Troup, Laurens County, Georgia, to William H. Crawford and others, n.p., 1833 May 11. ALS, 1 page on one folded sheet.
                                                                                                                                                                                          Declining a nomination from Crawford and others to run for governor of Georgia..
                                                                                                                                                                                        • Series 2: Crawford Family Correspondence 
                                                                                                                                                                                          • Folder 92 (MSN/EA 0511-92) Incoming family letters to William H. Crawford, 1804-1833. 8 letters, 23 pages.
                                                                                                                                                                                            Includes letters from Peter Crawford (1804); N. Crawford (1804); David Crawford (1810); John Gerardine (1818 and 1825); Bennett Crawford (1826 and 1831); and Nathan Crawford (1833). David Crawford (1767-1821) and Bennett Crawford (1781-1845) were brothers of William Harris Crawford.
                                                                                                                                                                                            • Folder 93 (MSN/EA 0511-93) Incoming letters to Susanna Gerardin Crawford, 1834-1847. 10 letters, 23 pages.
                                                                                                                                                                                              Susanna Gerardin Crawford was William H. Crawford's wife. Included is one letter from William H. Crawford, written 7 May 1833. Also included are six letters from daughter Caroline Crawford Dudley or from Caroline's own daughters.
                                                                                                                                                                                              • Folder 94 (MSN/EA 0511-94) Correspondence of Caroline Crawford, 1821 and n.d. 2 letters, 4 pages.
                                                                                                                                                                                                Caroline Crawford (1805-1875) was the oldest child of William and Susanna Crawford.
                                                                                                                                                                                                • Folder 95 (MSN/EA 0511-95) Incoming letters to Eliza Ann Crawford, 1826-1845. 13 letters, 44 pages.
                                                                                                                                                                                                  Eliza Ann Crawford (1809-1860) was the third child of William and Susanna Crawford. Included in the folder are letters from sister Caroline Crawford Dudley, niece Mary Dudley, and brother William Bibb Crawford.
                                                                                                                                                                                                  • Folder 96 (MSN/EA 0511-96) Correspondence of William Harris Crawford Jr., 1839-1867. 6 letters, 18 pages.
                                                                                                                                                                                                    William Harris Crawford Jr. (1813-1883) was the fifth child of William and Susanna Crawford. Included in the folder is a letter describing then death of brother Robert Crawford (1816-1847).
                                                                                                                                                                                                    • Folder 97 (MSN/EA 0511-97) Incoming letters to Susan Crawford, 1832-1847. 13 letters, 44 pages.
                                                                                                                                                                                                      Susan Crawford (1819-1874) was the seventh child of William and Susanna Crawford. Included in the folder are letters from brother-in-law George Dudley, sister Caroline Crawford Dudley, niece Mary Dudley, and brothers Robert and William Bibb Crawford.
                                                                                                                                                                                                      • Folder 98 (MSN/EA 0511-98) Incoming letters to Susan Crawford, 1847-1862. 14 letters, 46 pages.
                                                                                                                                                                                                        Included in the folder are letters from siblings Caroline Crawford Dudley, William H. Crawford, Jr., and William Bibb Crawford.
                                                                                                                                                                                                        • Folder 99 (MSN/EA 0511-99) Correspondence of William Wyatt Bibb Crawford, 1839, 1867. 2 letters, 8 pages.
                                                                                                                                                                                                          William Wyatt Bibb Crawford was the eighth and youngest child of William and Susanna Crawford.
                                                                                                                                                                                                          • Folder 100 (MSN/EA 0511-100) Miscellaneous family letters, 1828, 1867-1868. 5 letters, 18 pages.
                                                                                                                                                                                                          • Series 3: Miscellaneous Manuscripts and Printed Ephemera 
                                                                                                                                                                                                            • Folder 101 (MSN/EA 0511-101) Documents from the Georgia legislature re the impeachment hearings against Charles Tait, 1806 November 10-29. 10 documents, 35 pages.
                                                                                                                                                                                                              The charges were brought by John Clark against Crawford ally Tait, then judge of the superior court of Georgia's Western Judicial District. The report disapproving charges of impeachment was carried 53 to 3. On 2 December Clark challenged Crawford to a duel.
                                                                                                                                                                                                              • Folder 102 (MSN/EA 0511-102) Power of attorney for Reuben G. Beasley to recover cargoes of several detained ships, from merchants of Petersburg, Virginia, 1810 December. 1 document, 3 pages.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                • Folder 103 (MSN/EA 0511-103) Letters and manuscripts forwarded to Crawford by Thomas Sumter, U.S. minister to Portugal, from Rio de Janeiro, 1815. 9 items, 60 pages.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Included are: 1) List of items enclosed (2 pages); 2) Copy of Sumter's note of 25 February 1815 to the Marquês de Aguiar, Portuguese minister of foreign affairs, concerning the governor of Macao's delivery of an American prize to the British, with testimonial of B. C. Wilcocks (2 items, 11 pages); 3) Copy of note written by Manuel Belgrano and Bernardino de Rivadavia, and Sumter's reply, 17-18 January 1815 (4 pages); 4) Copy of a letter of 10 March 1815 from Sumter to American ministers in Europe, on the European powers and South America, with addendum of 13 March (2 items, 24 pages); 5) Copies of William Canning's address to the Regency of Portugal in December 1814, and of a letter of Lord Strangford of 7 April 1815, both with Sumter's commentary (2 items, 17 pages); 6) Copy of a note of Aguiar of 27 April 1815 (2 pages). Many of these items were sent to Europe with the Argentines Belgrano and Rivadavia, who left Rio de Janeiro on 15 March (see folder 12). The inventory includes many items that are not present.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                  • Folder 104 (MSN/EA 0511-104-F2) Manuscript geological map of Brazil, showing route from Rio de Janeiro to the diamond district of Serra do Frio, n.d. 1 item, 47 x 39 cm.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Docketed "For Wm. Maclure".
                                                                                                                                                                                                                    • Folder 105 (MSN/EA 0511-105) Manuscript copy of an agreement between France and the U.S. on whaling rights, 1819 February 14. 1 item, 15 pages.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                      In French, bearing the copied signatures of Louis XVIII and the comte Decazes. With docketing in Crawford's hand: "Mr Fox will translate within".
                                                                                                                                                                                                                      • Folder 106 (MSN/EA 0511-106) Manuscripts relating to W. H. Crawford's currency report of 1820, ca. 1820. 5 items, 15 pages.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Includes an unsigned essay entitled "National Currency" commenting favorably on Crawford's report, and four letter fragments (some by Crawford?) treating various aspects of the currency and National Bank issues.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                        • Folder 107 (MSN/EA 0511-107) W. H. Crawford's share in the Washington Library Company, 1822. 1 partly printed certificate.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Bearing the signature of William Matthews.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          • Folder 108 (MSN/EA 0511-108) William Turpin: Medical advice for W. H. Crawford, 1824 September 30. 1 manuscript, 1 page.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                            Recommending a strong decoction of Artemisia abrotanum (southernwood), used in a bath.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                            • Folder 109 (MSN/EA 0511-109) "Thoughts on M Wm. H. Crawford's Letter concerning Inter Mariage with the Indians, by a Ignorant Man," ca. 1825. 1 fascicle bound with thread, 34 pages. Written in ink.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                              An unpublished pamphlet written in the wake of the 1824 presidential election, supportive of Crawford and his Indian policies from his time as secretary of war, especially his proposal of Indians' intermarriage with whites as preferable to expulsion or extinction.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                              • Folder 110 (MSN/EA 0511-110) Appointment of William Harris Crawford as judge of the Superior Courts of the Northern Circuit of Georgia, 1827 November 10. 1 document, 2 pages.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                By the authority of John Forsyth, governor.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                • Folder 111 (MSN/EA 0511-111) Manuscript copy: "Some surprising effects of Electricity. From the History of the Royal Academy of Sciences at Paris, for the year 1753," n.d. 1 manuscript, 1 page.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  • Folder 112 (MSN/EA 0511-112) Miscellaneous manuscripts and printed ephemera, n.d. 3 items.